What is a Node ? | Computer Networking Interview Questions| Hindi

What is a Node ? | Computer Networking Interview Questions| Hindi

What is a Node ? | Networking Interview Questions| Hindi This video explains the concept of node in Computer networking . Networking interview questions and explanation in hindi

What are Server And Terminal Computer || Client or Node || Lecture In Urdu/Hindi

What are Server And Terminal Computer || Client or Node || Lecture In Urdu/Hindi

What are server Computer? What are Terminal Computer? What are Clients Computer? What are Node?

What is a Node in Computer Networking ?

What is a Node in Computer Networking ?

What's a cluster?

What's a cluster?

What's a computer cluster? How does it work? How does it handle work for a whole lot of people at once?

Node (networking)

Node (networking)

In communication networks, a node (Latin nodus, ‘knot’) is either a connection point, a redistribution point or a communication endpoint (some terminal equipment). The definition of a node depends on the network and protocol layer referred to. A physical network node is an active electronic device that is attached to a network, and is capable of sending, receiving, or forwarding information over a communications channel. A passive distribution point such as a distribution frame or patch panel is consequently not a node. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

Minute Science: What Does "14nm" Mean?

Minute Science: What Does "14nm" Mean?

- Let's figure this one out once and for all. Welcome to Minute Science, where we answer questions in under 4 minutes! FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/sciencestudiofanbase TWITTER: @ScStSalazar INSTAGRAM: @ScienceStudio Subscribe to our channel! Thanks for learning with us! Music: 'One' by The Last

Graph Theory Overview

Graph Theory Overview

For the full course see: https://goo.gl/iehZHU Follow along with the course eBook: https://goo.gl/i8sfGP In this lecture, we start to lay down some of our basic language for talking about networks that comes to us from graph theory a relatively new area of mathematics that studies the properties of graphs. Produced by: http://complexitylabs.io Twitter: https://goo.gl/ZXCzK7 Facebook: https://goo.gl/P7EadV LinkedIn: https://goo.gl/3v1vwF Transcription: When we hear the word network all sorts of things spring to mind like social networks and the Internet in particular, but the power of network theory is really in its high degree of abstraction, so the first thing for us to do is to try and start back at the beginning by forgetting what we think we know about networks and embrace the abstract language of networks what is called graph theory. In the formal language of mathematics a network is called a graph and graph theory is the area of mathematics that studies these objects called graphs. The first theory of graphs goes back to 1736, the first textbook came about in 1958 but most of the work within this field is less than a few decades old. In its essence a graph is really very simple, it consist of just two parts what are called vertices and edges. Firstly Vertices; a vertex or node is a thing, that is to say it is an entity and we can ascribe some value to it, so a person is an example of a node as is a car, planet, farm, city or molecule. All of these things have static properties that can be quantifies, such as the color of our car, the size of our farm, or the weight of our molecule. Within network science vertices are more often called nodes so we will be typically using this term during the course. Edges can be define as a relation of some sort between two or more nodes, this connection may be tangible as in the cables between computers on a network or the roads between cities within a national transportation system or these edges may by be intangible, such as social relations of friendship. Edges may be also called links, ties or relations and we will be often using this latter term during the course. The nodes belonging to an edge are called the ends, endpoints, or end vertices of the edge. Within graph theory networks are called graphs and a graph is define as a set of edges and a set vertices. A simple graph does not contain loops or multiple edges, but a multigraph is a graph with multiple edges between nodes. So where as a simple graph of a transpiration system would just tell us if there is a connection between two cities, a multigraph would show all the different connections between the two cities. Graphs can be directed or undirected. With an undirected graph edges have no orientation, for example a diplomatic relation between two nations may be mutual and thus have no direction to the edge between the nodes. These undirected graphs have unordered pairs of nodes, that means we can just switch them round, if Jane and Paul are married, we can say Jane is married to Paul or we can say Paul is married to Jane it makes no difference and thus it is an unordered pair.

Data Structures: Crash Course Computer Science #14

Data Structures: Crash Course Computer Science #14

Today we’re going to talk about on how we organize the data we use on our devices. You might remember last episode we walked through some sorting algorithms, but skipped over how the information actually got there in the first place! And it is this ability to store and access information in a structured and meaningful way that is crucial to programming. From strings, pointers, and nodes, to heaps, trees, and stacks get ready for an ARRAY of new terminology and concepts. Ps. Have you had the chance to play the Grace Hopper game we made in episode 12. Check it out here! http://thoughtcafe.ca/hopper/ Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrash... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids

Intro to Algorithms: Crash Course Computer Science #13

Intro to Algorithms: Crash Course Computer Science #13

Algorithms are the sets of steps necessary to complete computation - they are at the heart of what our devices actually do. And this isn’t a new concept. Since the development of math itself algorithms have been needed to help us complete tasks more efficiently, but today we’re going to take a look a couple modern computing problems like sorting and graph search, and show how we’ve made them more efficient so you can more easily find cheap airfare or map directions to Winterfell... or like a restaurant or something. Ps. Have you had the chance to play the Grace Hopper game we made in episode 12. Check it out here! http://thoughtcafe.ca/hopper/ CORRECTION: In the pseudocode for selection sort at 3:09, this line: swap array items at index and smallest should be: swap array items at i and smallest Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrash... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids

Philip Roberts: What the heck is the event loop anyway? | JSConf EU

Philip Roberts: What the heck is the event loop anyway? | JSConf EU

JavaScript programmers like to use words like, “event-loop”, “non-blocking”, “callback”, “asynchronous”, “single-threaded” and “concurrency”. We say things like “don’t block the event loop”, “make sure your code runs at 60 frames-per-second”, “well of course, it won’t work, that function is an asynchronous callback!” If you’re anything like me, you nod and agree, as if it’s all obvious, even though you don’t actually know what the words mean; and yet, finding good explanations of how JavaScript actually works isn’t all that easy, so let’s learn! With some handy visualisations, and fun hacks, let’s get an intuitive understanding of what happens when JavaScript runs. Transcript: http://2014.jsconf.eu/speakers/philip-roberts-what-the-heck-is-the-event-loop-anyway.html License: For reuse of this video under a more permissive license please get in touch with us. The speakers retain the copyright for their performances.

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