Dig Smart, Call Miss Utility at 811

Dig Smart, Call Miss Utility at 811

Excavator's Safety Video - Miss Utility

Excavator's Safety Video - Miss Utility

This video walks you through the four easy steps to safer digging: 1. Contact Miss Utility. 2. Wait for marks. 3. Confirm all marks. 4. Dig with care.

Gregory Plotnikoff - The Clinical Utility of 1,25 Dihydroxyvitamin D

Gregory Plotnikoff - The Clinical Utility of 1,25 Dihydroxyvitamin D

Watch this webinar on LabRoots at: https://www.labroots.com/ms/webinar/clinical-utility-125-dihydroxyvitamin Practicing Internist and vitamin D researcher Gregory A. Plotnikoff, MD, MTS, FACP, will review how new testing for 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D can enhance your clinical practice. Issues to be addressed include identification of patients most likely to benefit, when to test and how to interpret values. Dr. Plotnikoff will also address the latest data on vitamin D production, utilization and breakdown pathways. The program includes opportunities for questions.

MS DOS Chapter 3 Use of MD CD Command Tricks

MS DOS Chapter 3 Use of  MD CD Command Tricks

This YouTube channel is special for education purpose like as programming language and other utility software. If any query or You have problem related IT education please mail me: er.amprajapati95@gmail.com Please refer my blogger: http://informationtechnologysolution4u.blogspot.in/ My Other YouTube Channels are: Computer and networking http://goo.gl/xUU2Qe Hacking and Security https://goo.gl/y9jW9K Insurance https://goo.gl/hU4aQW Ashok Prajapati https://goo.gl/aUa9y4

Real World Utility of Fecal Calprotectin Testing

Real World Utility of Fecal Calprotectin Testing

Real World Utility of Fecal Calprotectin Testing Presented by: KT Park, MD, MS, Associate Professor and Co-Director, Stanford Children's Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Stanford University School of Medicine Speaker Biography: Dr. Park is an Associate Professor in the Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, and a Stanford Health Policy faculty associate. He serves as the Co-Director of Stanford Children's IBD Center and the medical director of the Short Stay Infusion Unit at Stanford Children's Health. Dr. Park's current NIH-funded research is to discover cost-effective ways to manage Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Recently, he has dedicated his clinical practice and research endeavors to monitor intestinal inflammation in patients with IBS and IBD. Webinar: Real World Utility of Fecal Calprotectin Testing Abstract: Patients presenting with persistent abdominal pain and diarrhea are common in clinical practice. Evaluation of these patients, assuming no alarm symptoms, can be difficult. Inflammatory bowel disease is always a possibility and while few will actually have IBD, the symptoms of IBS and IBD can overlap. Concern with a missed diagnosis of IBD leads many clinicians to request endoscopic evaluation. The strategy of testing for fecal calprotectin, a calcium and zinc binding protein complex found in neutrophil cytosolic protein, utilizes non-invasive diagnostic testing to stratify patients in need of endoscopic confirmation, reducing costs and improving the overall patient healthcare experience. Additionally, studies have shown that fecal calprotectin testing is an effective tool for disease management to ascertain therapy response and predict IBD relapse. Decreasing fecal calprotectin levels correlate well to drug effectiveness, while increasing levels can predict relapse even before the patient experiences clinical symptoms. For all these reasons fecal calprotectin is an important biomarker for IBD diagnosis and disease management. Learning Objectives: Utility of fecal calprotectin testing in diagnosis and IBD management. Correlating calprotectin cutoff levels with disease remission and predicting relapse. Optimal frequency of measuring calprotectin; single vs repeat measures. Sponsored By: Inova Diagnostics Earn PACE Credits: 1. Make sure you’re a registered member of LabRoots (https://www.labroots.com/webinar/real-world-utility-fecal-calprotectin-testing) 2. Watch the webinar on YouTube or on the LabRoots Website (https://www.labroots.com/webinar/real-world-utility-fecal-calprotectin-testing) 3. Click Here to get your PACE credits (January 25, 2020): (http://www.labroots.com/credit/pace-credits/2673/third-party) LabRoots on Social: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LabRootsInc Twitter: https://twitter.com/LabRoots LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/labroots Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/labrootsinc Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/labroots/ SnapChat: labroots_inc

Disease-Based Mortality After Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy: Utility Of The Enterprise Data W

Disease-Based Mortality After Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy:  Utility Of The Enterprise Data W

S105 - Benjamin K Poulose, MD, MPH, Joan Kaiser, RN, MS, William C Beck, MD, Pearlie Jackson, PhD, William H Nealon, MD, Kenneth W Sharp, MD, Michael D Holzman, MD, MPH

Joseph Gulfo, MD: The proper role of the FDA for the 21st century

Joseph Gulfo, MD: The proper role of the FDA for the 21st century

The current medical marketplace is vastly different from the marketplace that existed in the 1970s and ’80s when the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act codified the Food and Drug Administration’s mission. Despite rapidly advancing technology and patients’ increasing desire to try new drugs and devices, the FDA has strayed significantly from the statutorily defined safety and effectiveness standards for drug approvals. The FDA now very often demands proof of clinical utility, including survival and disease outcomes, as a requirement for premarket approval. But hard proof of clinical utility is elusive, even for drugs that are clearly shown to be safe and effective as labeled. Rather than blocking safe and effective drugs on such grounds, we should allow physicians and patients to make outcome-oriented decisions, and rely on the medical marketplace to drive physician adoption of safe and effective drugs that prove to have great clinical utility in real-world settings. A new study for the Mercatus Center at George Mason University evaluates current FDA policy toward new medical products and concludes that the FDA must return to its role as gatekeeper of safe and effective drugs and devices. The FDA has made significant incursions into private health decisions by exercising its public health mandate in a manner that was not intended by Congress. Rather than allowing doctors and their patients to determine how best to use a drug and ensuring that drugs placed in the market are safe and effective, the FDA has increasingly become concerned with controlling the outcomes of future judgments by physicians and patients regarding benefits and risks. The new medical marketplace should refocus the FDA on safety and effectiveness, leaving patients and doctors to evaluate and determine benefits and risks based on their experiences with the drugs. To read the study and learn more about its authors, Joseph V. Gulfo, MD, economist Jason Briggeman, and graduate student Ethan C. Roberts, see “The Proper Role of the FDA for the 21st Century.”

Learn to Use Basic Command Prompt (DOS) Commands in Windows

Learn to Use Basic Command Prompt (DOS) Commands in Windows

Follow me on twitter : http://twitter.com/sakitechonline Follow me on facebook: http://goo.gl/R95Pq Website: http://www.sakitechonline.com Learn how to use the following commands: dir, cd, cd.., move, copy, del, md, rd ::::: RELATED VIDEOS :::::: Network Troubleshooting using Command Prompt: http://youtu.be/AimCNTzDlVo Create a Bootable USB Flash Drive using Command Prompt: http://youtu.be/gpgNKkoDPZA Learn to use Basic Command Prompt Commands: http://youtu.be/MNwErTxfkUA Introduction to Linux and Basic Linux Commands: http://youtu.be/IVquJh3DXUA Install Ubuntu Linux using a bootable USB Flash Drive: http://youtu.be/lIF8e_5F9B4

Dr. Rolfo Discusses the Potential Utility of Ceritinib

Dr. Rolfo Discusses the Potential Utility of Ceritinib

Christian Rolfo, MD, PhD, MHBA, head, phase I clinical trials unit, Antwerp University Hospital, Belgium, discusses the potential utility of ceritinib. More from ESMO: http://www.onclive.com/conference-videos/esmo-2014

Health Benefits of Turmeric

Health Benefits of Turmeric

For more info: https://draxe.com/turmeric-benefits/?utm_campaign=Youtube-Jun-2015&utm_medium=social&utm_source=youtube&utm_term=turmeric In today’s video I want to share with you the incredible benefits of turmeric. There are over 6000 clinical studies proving turmeric to be the #1 healing herb today. The reason turmeric is so beneficial is because it contains an active compound called curcumin that is highly anti-inflammatory. Some of the main benefits include: 1. Anti-inflammatory which helps relieve pain 2. Helps balance blood sugar levels 3. Anti-microbrial properties 4. Supports detoxification 5. Cleans out your arteries A few ways to get more turmeric into your diet is by adding a tablespoon of turmeric to a glass of coconut milk as an herbal tea. You can find the recipe here: http://draxe.com/recipe/turmeric-tea-recipe/ Another way you can consume turmeric is by adding it to chicken breading, adding it to burger meat, salad, hummus, or simply in a capsule form. *This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe, and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.

Top Videos -  loading... Change country
Load 10 more videos
 
 
Sorry, You can't play this video
00:00/00:00
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
CLOSE
CLOSE
CLOSE