Hydrocodone Addiction

Hydrocodone Addiction

Doctors often prescribe hydrocodone for pain caused by an injury, operation or accident. Most people who follow their doctor's guidelines have no problem stopping hydrocodone. Anyone who uses the drug for a few weeks or more might develop a tolerance, meaning they need higher doses to feel relief. By itself, this doesn't necessarily mean they're addicted. So how do you know if someone is addicted to hydrocodone? Over time they'll start using the drug any time they want to feel better, not just for pain relief. Then the cravings set in. They may take the drug more often than their doctor recommended or in higher doses than prescribed. If they abruptly stop using the drug, they may have symptoms of withdrawal, such as muscle aches, excessive sweating, chills, nausea, mood swings and insomnia -- much like a bad flu.

The agony of opioid withdrawal — and what doctors should tell patients about it | Travis Rieder

The agony of opioid withdrawal — and what doctors should tell patients about it | Travis Rieder

The United States accounts for five percent of the world's population but consumes almost 70 percent of the total global opioid supply, creating an epidemic that has resulted in tens of thousands of deaths each year. How did we get here, and what can we do about it? In this personal talk, Travis Rieder recounts the painful, often-hidden struggle of opioid withdrawal and reveals how doctors who are quick to prescribe (and overprescribe) opioids aren't equipped with the tools to eventually get people off the meds. Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

Pharmacy Customers Afraid to Pick-up Hydrocodone

Pharmacy Customers Afraid to Pick-up Hydrocodone

Chattanooga police arrested 53-year-old Darren Lopaciuk Wednesday in connection with the pharmacy robbery. Lopaciuk is charged with two counts of aggravated robbery. He is currently awaiting extradition from Dade County back to Hamilton County. Tuesdsay, investigators say the suspect came into the pharmacy and jumped the counter. The suspect told the pharmacist he had a gun, and demanded oxycodone and hydrocodone pills. NewsChannel9 is taking a deeper look into the tremendous changes in pharmacy culture, as the result of many robberies like this one. What used to be to be a quick trip to the drug store is now some Chattanoogans most dreaded errand. One pharmacy customer is so concerned about her safety that she asked us to conceal her identity. "You worry about it more than you worry about going to the bank. I do. It's scary sometimes. It used to be something that you didn't have to think about. You just did what you needed to do. You didn't think about other people's pills and they didn't think about yours. But now you've just got to be careful about even buying cold medicine now." She says she's gets all types of painkillers on a regular basis, but each trip to the pharmacy presents a new dangerous situation. Even those filling those powerful prescriptions are taking extra precautions. Pharmacist Phil Smith tells us "pharmacies are having to set certain guidelines that are required to fill a prescription. Before that, we had people coming in from Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and Kentucky coming to get oxycodone." But, Billie Boggess tells NewsChannel9 that she gets her pain killers the safest way that she knows how. "A lot of people like me are getting their medication by mail. I get my pharmacy to ship it in to me. They bring it right to my door and I sign for it." Beginning this week the federal government has placed new restrictions on hundreds of medicines that contain hydrocodone. Patients will be limited to one, 90-day supply of medication and will then have to see a health care professional to get a refill. by Mikaya Thurmond

Teenage Drug Overdose - Brain Damage

Teenage Drug Overdose - Brain Damage

Jeremiah McKee was a normal teenager who made a bad decision that changed his life forever. He overdosed on drugs, didn't receive prompt medical attention, and is now confined to a bed. His story is a warning for parents and teens about the dangers of drug abuse.

Los explosivos efectos del medicamento 'hydrocodone'

Los explosivos efectos del medicamento 'hydrocodone'

Varios médicos se oponen a la aprobación de este medicamento que es destructivo y puede volverse adictivo. Primer Impacto: Encuentra las noticias y reportajes más impactantes que ocurren en Estados Unidos y el mundo, presentadas por Bárbara Bermudo y Pamela Silva-Conde. SUSCRIBETE!: http://bit.ly/10Tv8QF Síguenos en Twitter: http://bit.ly/ZhUzJU Síguenos en Facebook: http://on.fb.me/16NsW0D Visita UVIDEOS: http://bit.ly/10W33sR Más noticias en: http://noticias.univision.com [Repeat Video Title] http://www.youtube.com/user/UnivisionNoticias

Will The Feds Ban Your Pain Meds?

Will The Feds Ban Your Pain Meds?

What if you were injured and developed severe pain that wouldn't go away? Would your government let you take the kind of pain medication you need? If federal officials follow the recommendation of a Food and Drug Administration panel, many of the most effective prescription painkillers—including Vicodin, Percocet, and countless generics—would be banned. Scott Gardner says that kind of a move would be "intensely cruel." "I took Vicodin for three years," says Gardner. "I needed it. It got me through a very tough period of my life." The tough period began after a cycling accident shattered the left side of his body. After eight surgeries and countless hours of physical therapy, Gardner's once active life is now filled with limitations. He suffers from chronic pain that prevents him from sleeping more than a few hours at a time, and yet his pain today is nothing compared to the agonizing days and months following his accident. "When there's nothing but pain, there's no reason to live," says Gardner. "There were times where the only way I could stay sane and civil was because I could take painkillers." The fear of addiction and abuse already makes many suspicious of pain medication. Media reports about celebrities like Rush Limbaugh or Matthew Perry suggest that it's common for people to become addicted to medications they once took for legitimate medical conditions. And countless public service announcements remind us of the dangers of prescription drug abuse. Now the old fear of prescription drug abuse takes a new twist. The FDA panel is targeting drugs like Vicodin and Percocet because they contain acetaminophen, a popular painkiller also found in many over-the-counter drugs. Panel members warn that some Americans ingest too much acetaminophen, and overdoses can lead to liver damage, even death. But maybe the FDA panel isn't putting this threat into context. After all, mundane threats like falling down stairs claim more lives than acetaminophen overdoses. And it turns out the more common fear—that patients will become addicted to prescription drugs—is also overblown. In fact, the barrage of warnings we hear about prescription drugs obscures an important point—people saddled with severe chronic pain need these painkillers. Says Gardner, "I think people who haven't dealt with pain don't really know what it's like." "Don't Get Hurt" is written and produced by Ted Balaker, who also hosts. The director of photography is Alex Manning, the field producer is Paul Detrick and the animation in the piece is from Hawk Jensen. Approximately five minutes. Go to Reason.tv for downloadable versions of all videos, more links, and other related materials.

Xanax Addiction Ep.1 | Interview w/ Former Xanax Addict | Why Abusing Benzos is Dangerous

Xanax Addiction Ep.1 | Interview w/ Former Xanax Addict | Why Abusing Benzos is Dangerous

In this video, a former Xanax addict shares his subjective experience with abusing benzos and why it is dangerous. Help Support This Channel: https://www.paypal.me/CGKid If you or a loved one struggle with drug addiction feel free to reach out to me: Register on my web app: https://shamelessprotocol.com/ Join Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/559342184435501/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cg_kid/ Snapchat Name: cg-kid Book a Conversation: https://www.shamelessprotocol.com/book-cg/ Alprazolam (Xanax) comes from the benzodiazepine class of substances. Abusing this compound can lead to many problems including the lethal Xanax withdrawal. Xanax addiction is one that may struggle with due to the benzo withdrawal being so painful. The abuse of benzos needs to stop, quitting Xanax requires medical attention due to the lethal nature of withdrawal.

Hydrocodone, Dilaudid, or Morphine? Sickle Cell Vlog

Hydrocodone, Dilaudid, or Morphine? Sickle Cell Vlog

Pain management at home, ER, & Outpatient Visits. What do my #sicklecellwarriors take? Join me #PositivelyHealthy Music: Intro- SOS Throughout- Ciroc the Phuck Up! Both by: C. Moye https://www.youtube.com/user/RichmenMusicGroup IG: @paris_frenchi Twitter : @paris_frenchi FB: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frenchi-J/877324948955232?ref=profile Business inquiries ONLY parisj704@gmail.com

Elderly Opioid Addiction

Elderly Opioid Addiction

How Hydrocodone (and other opioids) Works

How Hydrocodone (and other opioids) Works

Intro to how opioids like hydrocodone work Check us out on Facebook for DAILY FREE REVIEW QUESTIONS and updates! (https://www.facebook.com/medschoolmadeeasy) Check out our website for TONS OF FREE REVIEW QUESTIONS! (http://medschoolmadeeasy.com/) Thanks for stopping by, and we love hearing from you! Disclaimer: the information in this video only represents the knowledge and property of the video’s authors- no one else.

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