Breaking down the eight primals of the beef carcass

Breaking down the eight primals of the beef carcass

Phil Bass of Certified Angus Beef explains the eight primal cuts of the beef carcass to attendees of the Education and Culinary Center of CAB.

How to Fabricate (butcher) An Airline Chicken Breast

How to Fabricate (butcher) An Airline Chicken Breast

This video will teach you how to fabricate or "butcher" an airline chicken breast, a poultry breast with the first joint of the wing still attached. Even though this technique is demonstrated using a chicken, you can fabricate an airline breast with any number of birds including ducks, turkeys & squabs to name a few. Leaving the first joint attached to the breast is not only visually appealing, but the attached bone will also keep the protein moist during the cooking. This Episode's Show Notes: http://www.stellaculinary.com/cks28

Tour of Pork Cuts

Tour of Pork Cuts

People enjoy a variety of pork cuts but don't know where those cuts come from on a pig. In this video, Barney Wilborn invites you into the Auburn Meat lab for a "tour" of a pork carcass.

Roof Truss Basics - Structural Engineering And Home Building Tips

Roof Truss Basics - Structural Engineering And Home Building Tips

http://www.homebuildingandrepairs.com/engineering/index.html Click on this link to learn more about engineering, house framing and building design. Watch his video to learn more about roof truss systems, individual roof trusses and engineered roofing systems. In this video we will provide you with the basics and a brief explanation of how a engineered roof system works. Don't forget to check out some of our other websites, books and videos.

Beef Butchery - Cutting the Teres Major

Beef Butchery - Cutting the Teres Major

An expert butcher at Silver Fern Farms demonstrates how the teres major (aka petite tender, shoulder tender) is cut from a side of beef. Order this grass-fed beef: http://www.marxfoods.com/grass-fed-beef Transcript: "The teres major, also known as the petite tender, comes from the animal's shoulder, and gets little use, making it one of the tenderist cuts. To get the teres major off of the carcass, the clod, which is also part of the chuck, needs to be removed first. This cut is also used to make the flat iron. Follow the meat down the natural cutting line, and under the shoulder blade, keeping the cut intact. Mark the blade bone to make sure all the meat comes off. Pull the clod down as far as possible to guarantee a long tail. Use the knife to clear away any fat to get a good view of the seam line. Cut down that line to separate the teres major from the clod. Take care to avoid any damage to the clod or the teres major. Once off the clod, cut away any excess meat & fat, trimming all the way down to the membrane. Cut off any fat or extra meat & make the cut square. Great skill is required to remove the teres major from the carcass, making this tender treat tough to come by. It's best cooked as a flavorsome steak. And that's how you trim a teres major, one of the most tender beef cuts."

Robotic System for Plasma Cutting Structural Steel Beams & Heavy Plates - Inovatech SteelPRO 900

Robotic System for Plasma Cutting Structural Steel Beams & Heavy Plates - Inovatech SteelPRO 900

Plasma cutting structural steel: http://robot.fanucamerica.com/Products/Robots/material-removal-robots.aspx FANUC America Authorized System Integrator Inovatech Engineering is helping to revolutionize the steel fabrication industry by providing fabricators with automated solutions that include industrial robots from FANUC to plasma cut structural steel beams and heavy plates. The system seen here is Inovatech’s SteelPRO or SP900 - A complete robotic beam line and plate cutting system. Inovatech’s SP900 comes standard with four-side cutting, 65 feet of infeed and outfeed conveyor, two 6’ x 10’ robotic plate tables, installation and training. The SP900 also comes standard with all the software required to run the system, including ProNest® nesting software from Hypertherm. The SP900 performs the work of seven single-purpose fabrication machines, and eliminates the need to transport profiles to other work cells. Four-side cutting, coping, plasma drilling, marking, beam splitting and sawing with continuous operation and high production volume are all possible with the SP900. Inovatech’s SteelPRO software automatically creates the cut program while the nine-axis robotic gantry performs the four-side beam processing. The SP900 is a complete robotic beam line machine with built-in touch sensing and collision protection. A single FANUC robot can process all four sides of a beam at once, making this robotic plasma cutting system fast and cost efficient. The SP900 combines a high performance six-axis FANUC robot with a robotic gantry and precision-made Güdel® linear track system to create a total of nine axes. In addition to providing versatility, using this type of precise, reliable equipment results in aerospace quality repeatability, as the SP900 can plasma cut structural steel and ‘drill’ bolt holes to 0.02mm. Finally the SP900 robotic plate table system cuts and processes flat plate, base plates and stiffener plates with six-axis beveling capability. The standard SP900 system comes equipped with two 6’ by 10’ plate tables that allow for continuous production – while one table is in production the other table can be loaded and unloaded. These plate tables can be upgraded to two 10’ by 24’ robotic plate tables. Hypertherm’s plasma cutting units power all cutting in Inovatech’s systems. The SP900 comes standard with high definition plasma and industry leading True Hole® technology from Hyperthem that is able to cut, saw, plasma drill, slot, mark and cope structural profiles up to 3.2″ (80mm) thick. Hypertherm plasma units on Inovatech SteelPRO machines produce outstanding quality bolt holes in just seconds. Inovatech’s team of dedicated engineers take the time to understand their customer’s needs and requirements to develop productive and profitable solutions. Put the Inovatech team and their world-class integrated robotic fabrication solutions to work for you. To learn more please visit http://www.inovatechengineering.com.

Piping_Fabricate 45 Degree Elbow(miter bend) from pipe

Piping_Fabricate 45 Degree Elbow(miter bend) from pipe

This video explain how to fabricate 45 deg Elbow from pipe? Miter bend calculation by using 2 cut 3 piece method This channel explain about piping isometric,ndt,welding,cutting,pipe fit-up,fabrication,erection,elbow cutting,elbow center calculation, welding process,p&id details,valves,pressure gauge, hydro testing details, welding calculation, pipe supports,equipment,pumps,Trigonometric formula application, pipe offset calculation, pipe fitter manual. Watch and Subscribe:https://www.youtube.com/Technicalpiping Like :https://www.facebook.com/pipingtechniques

Shop Math: How to Calculate and Cut a Fitted Angle - Kevin Caron

Shop Math: How to Calculate and Cut a Fitted Angle - Kevin Caron

From http;//www.kevincaron.com - Artist Kevin Caron reveals how he figures out what angle he needs while fabricating metal, then cuts it on his bandsaw .... Caron is calculating how he needs to lay out a fountain he has been commissioned to make. He's using pipes as spacers between the water feature's eight dishes. The pipes need to be just the right height so that, when he gets everything put together, the fountain is 40" tall. He first figures out how deep each dish is and how long each pipe needs to be, and don't forget to put the angle on each pipe! It requires a lot of math. "I hate math," he admits. Once he figured out how tall the bottom dish is - 6" - he was able to start spacing out the other seven dishes within 40" and figure out the height of each pipe. They're going to end up being about 3-1/4" to about 3-1/2" long. But then there's that pesky angle ..... Caron shows the pipe that will hold the next dish. There's a big gap between the bottom of the pipe and the bottom dish, so now it's time to calculate the angle so the pipe is flush to the metal dish. That brings us back to that darn math again. A steel protractor is the perfect tool. He has one that was his brother's that must be at least 30 years old, and it still works fine. He places the protractor's straight-edged base across where he wants to weld the pipe, then adjusts the tool's lever until it's vertical. He knows it's vertical because he uses his level to check it. Once the level's bubble indicates it's correct, he looks at the protractor to see how many degrees the angle is. Caron shows how he measures the number of degrees from 90, which is straight up, to the notch. This time the notch is at 22 degrees. He sets his Ellis 1800 horizontal bandsaw by loosening up the cutting attachment and pivoting it to 22 degrees, then locks it back into place. He puts the pipe in place and clamps it in. Then Caron checks the bandsaw's throat - you want to set your guide just far enough to miss whatever you are cutting. If you set it too wide, the blade can twist and wobble, giving you uneven cuts. Caron puts on his safety glasses and fires up the machine, which cuts through the steel pipe easily. When it's finished cutting, Caron releases the metal pipe from the clamp and walks back over to his workbench. To check his work, he places the pipe in place on the dish and puts his level up against it. The bubble is just right. He then checks it the other way vertically, then both ways horizontally across the top of the pipe. He turns it a bit to level it, then again checks it the other way. It's dead on. Each dish must be level, or each one thereafter will be at an angle, which will throw off the flow of the water. That would be fatal! Next he'll weld the pipe to the bottom of the next dish, then flip it over and weld it onto this dish. Then he continues with each subsequent dish. There's lots of math and lots of brainpower, so Caron's going to go back to what he's doing. That means you have time to go out to http://www.kevincaron.com to see more how-to videos and his wild work. Well, you might want to take one more moment to hear Kevin indulge in his love of sound .... "Inspired sculpture for public & private places." Artist Kevin Caron has been sculpting full time since 2006. You can see his more than 45 commissions in public and private places coast-to-coast and online at http://www.kevincaron.com. Please follow me! Twitter: https://twitter.com/kevincaronart Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kevincaronstudios

How to fabricate elbow (miter bend) from pipe

How to fabricate elbow (miter bend) from pipe

How to fabricate elbow miter bend from pipe,calculation and fabrication methods,miter 4 cut 5 piece,ASME B 31.3 method formula. This channel explain about piping isometric,ndt,welding,cutting,pipe fit up,pipe fit-up,fabrication,erection,elbow cutting,elbow center calculation,welding process,p&id details,valves,pressure gauge,hydro testing details,welding calculation,pipe supports,equipment,pumps SUBSCRIBE:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_OMLtbpHwtLPGx6od7wO2A LIKE :https://www.facebook.com/pipingtechniques Disco Lounge by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100602 Artist: http://incompetech.com/

Miter Bend Marking Process & Formula Part 2

Miter Bend Marking Process & Formula Part 2

This Vedio Show Is How To Miter Bend Marking. Miter bends are not standard fittings they are fabrication from pipe.Usually Pipe Fitter, Febricator & Piping Enginering Use Of Miter Bend Watter,Fire Fitings & Pectrochamical Gas Oil Line. Miter Bend Perfect Size 10 Inch Avobe Becuse Lrage Size Elbow Expensive.Miter Bend Febrication In Three , Four & Five Piecs 45 Degree & 90 Degree.Thank You For Visiting us We Hope To See You Agian Mechanical Education Channel. Any Help Post Tihs Group :-https://www.facebook.com/groups/271424390049505/

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