Working Out with Biceps Tendonitis (DON’T SKIP BICEPS!)

Working Out with Biceps Tendonitis (DON’T SKIP BICEPS!)

Make gains without pain with this - http://athleanx.com/x/make-gains Subscribe to our youtube channel - http://bit.ly/2b0coMW Biceps tendonitis is one of the most common gym injuries that can keep you from working out. The ironic part about this injury is however that it is likely not your biceps workouts and exercises that are causing the problem in the first place. In this video, I show you the real cause of biceps tendonitis and give you hope to be able to continue your biceps workouts despite dealing with this issue. The anatomy of the biceps is an important place to start when discussing the issue of biceps tendonitis. There are two heads to the biceps; one is the short head which attaches to the coracoid process in the shoulder and the other is the long head which attaches to the top of the glenoid or socket of the shoulder. When there isn’t adequate strength in the rotator cuff muscles, the head of the humerus migrates upward in the socket any time you perform any overhead lifting exercise. Don’t get confused with the term overhead either. It is possible to be descending through a rep as in the bottom of a pullup and have your upper arm travel up over your head. The important idea is that once the arm travels past shoulder height you are potentially going to have a problem if you have an unbalanced rotator cuff. When this happens without adequate strength in the cuff you will have your humeral head migrate too far upwards. This can cause pinching and impingement of the structures that sit just above the humeral head and just below the acromion or roof of the shoulder joint. The tendon of the long head of the biceps gets jammed against the roof of the joint and winds up getting pinched. When you repeat this process over and over (as you would with any series of sets and repetitions in exercises that place the arm overhead) you will get an eventual breakdown and fraying of the tendon. The first stage of this is usually seen in an inflamed biceps tendon which results in biceps tendonitis. The irony again is that traditional biceps curls are likely not to aggravate the condition. In fact, by stimulating blood flow to the muscle, you may actually help the situation to speed healing by including curls rather than avoiding them when this hits. What you will want to modify however is the amount of overhead pressing, bench pressing or even the position of your arms during squatting. All of these exercises are much more likely to bother a bad shoulder once it is already inflamed or they are causing the pain in the first place. Make adaptations to your training to continue to workout without having to skip arm day all together. For a complete workout program that places a high priority on controlling pain while maximizing your gains, be sure to head to http://athleanx.com and get the ATHLEAN-X Training System. See how working around pain and training smart can not only keep the gains coming but for a long time by training like an athlete. For more videos on how to build big biceps without getting biceps tendonitis, be sure to subscribe to our channel here on youtube at http://youtube.com/user/jdcav24

Biceps Tendon Pathology - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Biceps Tendon Pathology - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Educational video describing conditions of the proximal and distal biceps muscle. The biceps muscle has two tendon in the shoulder: Long head Short head Pian at the forn of the shoulder commonly occurs from conditions affecting the long head of the biceps tendon. The biceps tendon arises from the superior labrum at the top of the glenoid. It passes underneath the transverse humerla ligament in the groove between the lesser and the greater tiuberosity of the humerus. The biceps tendon ends by inserting into the proximal radius at the elbow region. What is the function of the biceps? •Humeral head depressor •Strong flexor of the elbow •Supinator of the forearm. Conditions affecting the biceps Biceps tendonitis It is inflammation or irritation of the upper biceps tendon. Recurrent microtruama to the tendon, overusue and repetive overhead activities, leads to biceps tendonitis. These activities include sports such as baseball, tennis, swimming, or lifting weights. Usually occurs in association with other shoulder problems as shoulder impingement, tears of the glenoid labrum, shoulder instability, shoulder joint arthritis and rotator cuff tears. Shoulder impingement is a main cause of biceps tendonitis. The soft tissue between the humeral head and the acromion can be pinched or squeezed with arm movements. Symptoms •Anterior shoulder pain •Bicipital groove tenderness Speed test The arm is supinated and the elbow is extended. The patient is asked to actively flex the shoulder while the examiner is applying resistance to the movement. Tenderness over the bicipital groove indicates tendonitis of the long head of the biceps. Treatment Conservative treatment •Rest •Ice •Physical therapy •Steroid injections (around the tendon, not through the tendon). Surgical treatment If the condition does not improve with conservative treatment. Biceps tenotomy: damaged biceps tendon is released form its attachment. Cut the biceps tendon and let it fly. Done in elderly and low demand patients. Patients may have subjective cramping. May result in a popeye bulge. Damaged section of the biceps is removed. Remaing tendon is reattached to the upper bone (humerus). Usuallyu done for high demand patients. Biceps tendon rupture The biceps tendon may rupture at the top of the bicipital groove or it may rupture at the radial tuberosity in the elbow. Proximal At the bicipital groove. Muscle moves towards the elbow (popeye). There is minimal loss of function with a long head rupture because the short head of biceps remains attached to the coracoid process. Distal At the radial tuberosity of the elbow. “pop” felt at the elbow when the tendon ruptures. Rupture must be repaired otherwise there will be loss of flexion and supination. Hook test The patient actively supinates and flexes the elbow at 90 degrees. If the distal biceps tendon can be hooked form the lateral side of the elbow, then the biceps tendons is intact. Treatment •Proximal ruptures can be treated either conservatively or surgically. Non-operatively for elderly and most patients will become asymptomatic after 4-6 weeks. Includes rest, ice and physical therapy. •Surgical treatments is reattaching the torn section of the tendon to the bone (tenodesis). It is usually done in association with other reconstructive surgery. Rarely done for cosmesis. •Avulsion of the distal biceps tendon is treated with tenodesis using sutures to anchor the tendon into the radius. Biceps tendon subluxation or dislocation The transverse humeral ligament and pulley system which holds the biceps tendon within the bicipital groove can become injured. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC

Got Bicep tendinitis? Shoulder pain? Fix it now! | Trevor Bachmeyer | SmashweRx

Got Bicep tendinitis? Shoulder pain? Fix it now! | Trevor Bachmeyer | SmashweRx

Top Treatment For Bicep Tendonitis (Physical Therapy DIY)

Top Treatment For Bicep Tendonitis (Physical Therapy DIY)

From http://famouspt.com/ "Famous" Physical Therapists, Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck, demonstrate the top treatment for Bicep Tendinitis per viewer request. Make sure to like us on FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/Physical-Therapy-317002538489676/timeline/ Check out the Products Bob and Brad LOVE on their Amazon Channel: https://www.amazon.com/shop/physicaltherapyvideo Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/PtFamous Our book “Three Simple Steps To Treat Back Pain” is available on Kindle http://www.amazon.com/Three-Simple-Steps-Treat-Back-ebook/dp/B00BPU4O5G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1444092626&sr=8-1&keywords=3+simple+steps+to+treat+back+pain CONTACT US! Send us your video requests or suggestions or product samples that you would like us to try out and make a video review on. If you are 40 or over and fighting the fight, we want to feature YOU so email us your picture and story to FamousPTs@Gmail.com Enjoy the video and Like Us on FaceBook! https://www.facebook.com/pages/Famouspts/465263730213707 Check out Bob's Kindle book on Amazon, "Three Simple Steps to Treat Back Pain" here: http://www.amazon.com/Three-Simple-Steps-Treat-Back-ebook/dp/B00BPU4O5G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1383052830&sr=8-1&keywords=bob+schrupp+back+pain

Biceps Tendonitis Stretches & Exercises - Ask Doctor Jo

Biceps Tendonitis Stretches & Exercises - Ask Doctor Jo

Biceps Tendonitis (a.k.a. bicipital tendonitis) is an inflammation or irritation of the long head of the biceps tendon. When it gets irritated, it can be very painful and limit movement in the shoulder. See Doctor Jo’s blog post about this at: http://www.askdoctorjo.com/biceps-tendonitis The biceps tendon is a strong, cord-like structure that connects the biceps muscle to the bones in the shoulder. To stretch the biceps muscles and tendons, you can stand in a doorway or use a sturdy chair to hold onto. With your palm open facing in front of you, place it on the sturdy chair or doorway and lean forward bringing your shoulder forward and across your body. Hold that for 30 seconds and do it three times. Another way to stretch them is to use the seat of the chair, and place your palm down on it with your fingers facing away from you. Turn around so your arm is behind you, and again lean forward and push your shoulder in front of you and slightly across your body. Hold for 30 seconds and do three of them. Now you are going to sit in a chair and use a resistive band. Anchor the band onto something sturdy or have someone hold onto it for you. This exercise will be for internal rotation. Anchor it to a table leg, in a door, or have someone hold it for you. If you want to roll up a small towel and place it between your side and your elbow, this will keep your arm close to your side through out the exercise. Keep your elbow at about a 90 degree angle and your thumb up towards the ceiling. Slowly pull your arm and the band in towards your stomach, and then slowly come back out. You don’t need to come back out far, just to where your forearm is straight out in front of you. Start off with 10 of these, and then work your way up to 20-25. If that becomes easy, then move up with resistive bands. Now you will do a shoulder external rotation. The band will be on the outside of your body. Start off with your arm at your stomach. Try to keep your elbow by your side through out the exercise. If you want to roll up a small towel and place it between your elbow and your side, this will keep your arm close to your side through out the exercise. Keep your elbow at about a 90 degree angle and your thumbs up towards the ceiling. Also try to keep your wrist in a neutral position. You don’t want to over stress your wrist, and then have a wrist injury. Slowly pull arm out away from your body, and then slowly come back in. Start off with 10 of these, and then work your way up to 20-25. If that becomes easy, then move up with resistive bands. The last exercise is bicep curls. You can step on the band, and keep your elbow by your side. Pull all the way up and all the way down. Make sure you are doing the full motion to maximize working the muscle. Make sure you are controlling the band; don't let the band control you! Related Videos: Rotator Cuff Exercises & Stretches with Resistive Bands: https://youtu.be/WR1W79AWOag?list=PLPS8D21t0eO_Ny9ors3aP4K1P_91a2-yw Shoulder Pain Top 3 Exercises: https://youtu.be/vbUm5rsPt5Y?list=PLPS8D21t0eO_Ny9ors3aP4K1P_91a2-yw =========================================== SUBSCRIBE for More Videos: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=askdoctorjo ======================================= Doctor Jo is a Doctor of Physical Therapy. http://www.AskDoctorJo.com http://www.facebook.com/AskDoctorJo http://www.pinterest.com/AskDoctorJo https://www.instagram.com/AskDoctorJo http://www.twitter.com/AskDoctorJo http://plus.google.com/+AskDoctorJo ======================================= Biceps Tendonitis Stretches & Exercises: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9-yNm0NpVc DISCLAIMER: This content (the video, description, links, and comments) is not medical advice or a treatment plan and is intended for general education and demonstration purposes only. This content should not be used to self-diagnose or self-treat any health, medical, or physical condition. Don’t use this content to avoid going to your own healthcare professional or to replace the advice they give you. Consult with your healthcare professional before doing anything contained in this content. You agree to indemnify and hold harmless Ask Doctor Jo, LLC and its officers for any and all losses, injuries, or damages resulting from any and all claims that arise from your use or misuse of this content. Ask Doctor Jo, LLC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Use of this content is at your sole risk.

Distal Biceps Tendon 2

Distal Biceps Tendon 2

How to diagnose Bicep Tendonitis

How to diagnose Bicep Tendonitis

Dr. Tsourmas shows the proper way to diagnose Bicep Tendonitis of the shoulder. Workplace Diagnosis is the first online, real-time video patient diagnosis tool for physicians. Subscribe to Texas Mutual for more videos or visit www.texasmutual.com to search for the injury you wish to diagnose.

Biceps Brachii Muscle - Origins & Actions - Human Anatomy | Kenhub

Biceps Brachii Muscle - Origins & Actions - Human Anatomy | Kenhub

This video teaches the origins, insertion, innervation and actions of the biceps brachii muscle - the strongest forearm supinator. Quiz yourself on the muscles of the arm: https://khub.me/qa9sp Oh, are you struggling with learning anatomy? We created the ★ Ultimate Anatomy Study Guide ★ to help you kick some gluteus maximus in any topic. Completely free. Download yours today: https://khub.me/v68me The biceps brachii muscle (commonly called biceps, or "bi's" for all you weight lifters out there) is a large, thick muscle of the upper arm and it is the most powerful forearm supinator. It consists of two heads: The short head and long head of biceps. The surface anatomy of the anterior side of the upper arm is essentially formed by the biceps. While both its origin tendons are covered by the deltoid, its insertion tendon can be easily seen and palpated in the crook of the arm. The biceps innervation is provided by the musculocutaneous nerve. In this tutorial we will explore the origin, insertion, innervation and function of this important muscle. - 0:16 biceps brachii location - 0:43 long head of biceps origin - 1:31 short head of biceps origin - 1:42 insertion at radial tuberosity - 2:06 innervation: musculocutaneous nerve - 2:16 functions of the biceps brachii Want to test your knowledge on the muscles of the arm? Take this quiz: https://khub.me/qa9sp Read more on the movements and muscles of the arm in our free article, in order to enhance your understanding about the arrangement and how the different muscles in our upper extremity work together: https://khub.me/ow7fa For more engaging video tutorials, interactive quizzes, articles and an atlas of Human anatomy and histology, go to https://khub.me/yaj92

Do Your Biceps Hurt? THEN YOU NEED TO WATCH THIS! - Eliminate Tendon & Muscle Pain

Do Your Biceps Hurt? THEN YOU NEED TO WATCH THIS! - Eliminate Tendon & Muscle Pain

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Biceps Brachii Anatomy - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Biceps Brachii Anatomy - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the anatomy of the biceps brachii muscle with simple images. The Biceps Brachii is a two-headed muscle that lies on the upper arm between the shoulder and the elbow. The long head of the biceps tendon arises from the supraglenoid tubercle. The biceps tendon is intra-articular. The long head of the biceps tendon arises from the supraglenoid tubercle. The tendon also arises from the superior aspect of the glenoid labrum slightly posterior. The long head of the biceps then passes underneath the transverse humeral ligament in the bicipital groove between the lesser and greater tuberosity of the humerus. The area where the biceps tendon passes through the bicipital groove is a common site of bicipital tendonitis and anterior shoulder pain. The long head if the biceps tendon lies between the two tendons of the supraspinatus and subscapularis muscles. Occasionally the biceps tendon dislocates from the groove such as with a subscapularis tendon rupture. Rupture of the long head of the biceps tendon may occur at the bicipital groove and the muscle then moves towards the elbow (Popeye muscle). Origin and insertion: the short head of the biceps originates from the coracoid process of the scapula. The long and short heads then join together and insert into the proximal radius at the elbow region. The biceps tendon insertion foot print is ribbon shaped on the ulnar aspect of the radial tuberosity. Some consider the bicipital aponeurosis to be another insertion for the distal biceps tendon. The bicipital aponeurosis is attached to the deep fascia on the medial side of the forearm proximally. The brachial artery and median nerve is deep to the bicipital aponeurosis with the medial cubital vein passing above it. This area is important in surgery and in written exams. Rupture of the distal biceps tendon: the biceps muscle may become ruptured at its insertion site into the radial tuberosity. The tendon will retract up into the upper arm causing a bump or “Popeye” sign. The biceps muscle is innervated by the musculocutaneous nerve which runs under the biceps. The lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve originates from the musculocutaneous nerve and lies between the brachialis and the biceps muscles. The musculocutaneous nerve also supplies these two muscles: brachialis and coracobrachialis muscles. The coracobrachialis muscle also originates from the coracoid process medial to the short head of the biceps. Injury to the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve may occur when treating a distal biceps tendon rupture. The use of anterior locking screws for the distal humerus may cause injury to the musculocutaneous nerve. Injury to the nerve results in loss of sensation along the radial aspect of the forearm. Function: the function of the biceps muscle is to supinate the forearm and flex the elbow. Herniated disc at C4-C5 will affect the function of the biceps. Biceps reflex is primarily C5. C5-C6 are responsible for elbow flexion Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Background music provided as a free download from YouTube Audio Library. Song Title: Every Step

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