BFI 1: tune can talk

BFI 1: tune can talk

My singing monsters gay

Mark Kermode reviews Love Exposure (2008) | BFI Player

Mark Kermode reviews Love Exposure (2008) | BFI Player

Mark Kermode straps in for Sion Sono's madcap mix of Manga-inflected fantasy and violently explicit comedy. Watch Love Exposure on BFI Player (UK only): https://player.bfi.org.uk/subscription/film/watch-love-exposure-2008-online Watch more on BFI Player: http://player.bfi.org.uk/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BritishFilmInstitute Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/britishfilminstitute/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BFI

BFI Team Roping Top 5_2009

BFI Team Roping Top 5_2009

Top 5 in the short round

In conversation with... Jane Fonda | BFI Comedy Genius

In conversation with... Jane Fonda | BFI Comedy Genius

Activist, actor, producer, writer and Hollywood icon Jane Fonda visited the BFI Southbank to talk about her career. Speaking to Samira Ahmed, Fonda recalls her early years in Hollywood, the backlash at her decision to protest the Vietnam war and gives her opinion of the #time'sup and #MeToo movements. 9 to 5 is a gloriously feminist revenge comedy that sees three put-upon office workers turn the tables on their sleazy boss. Judy (Fonda), Violet (Tomlin) and Doralee (Parton) couldn’t be more different from each other, but they bond over being mistreated by their boss: he yells at Judy on her first day, consistently takes credit for Violet’s ideas and sexually harasses Doralee. Fed up with him, and the sexist practices of their office, they dream of his removal. Based on an idea by Fonda, who had just formed her own production company, this is a brazen comedy that wears its politics on its sleeve. With an inspiring friendship at its heart, it’s a film that celebrates women supporting each other – and feels more relevant now than ever before. 9 to 5 is currently screening nationwide as part of the BFI's Comedy Genius season: https://www.bfi.org.uk/whats-on/bfi-film-releases/nine-to-five Subscribe: http://bit.ly/subscribetotheBFI Watch more on BFI Player: http://player.bfi.org.uk/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BritishFilmInstitute Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/britishfilminstitute/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BFI

ONLY YOU clip | BFI London Film Festival 2018

ONLY YOU clip | BFI London Film Festival 2018

As Glasgow celebrates New Year’s Eve, a chance encounter brings Jake (Josh O’Connor) and Elena (Laia Costa) together and the attraction is instant. Sexy and smitten, they’re totally swept up in each other and the relationship develops at speed. Sure, there’s an age gap, but not one that matters to them, especially when everything feels this good. But this bliss is tested when the couple consider starting a family and hit a brick wall of biology. For her feature debut, Harry Wootliff has crafted an authentic romantic drama that is fearless in its look at modern love, particularly the emotions and practicalities surrounding fertility. It’s a rarely explored topic, brought vividly to life by O’Connor and Costa, two of the most charismatic onscreen presences in contemporary cinema. Explore the LFF programme: https://whatson.bfi.org.uk/lff/ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/subscribetotheBFI Watch more on BFI Player: http://player.bfi.org.uk/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BritishFilmInstitute Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/britishfilminstitute/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BFI

Goodnight with Sabrina (1959) | BFI National Archive

Goodnight with Sabrina (1959) | BFI National Archive

Legendary bubbly blonde 1950s TV starlet Sabrina (born Norma Sykes) slips into something more comfortable after luxuriating with her loofah in this (very slightly) saucy home-viewing 8mm glamour short. Discovered by diminutive, bespectacled comedian Arthur Askey, Sabrina had been enlisted as a shapely 'gimmick' for his 1950s television series, Before Your Very Eyes. Sabrina's popularity briefly threatened to eclipse that of Askey himself. As the 'silly little man' revealed in his biography: "she eventually became bigger (in every sense) than me in the show... the tail began to wag the dog, so she had to go." Sabrina made the most of her fame, though, appearing in adverts, feature films, and at least two 8mm shorts for Walton Films, circa 1959 - this, and At Home with Sabrina, shot in colour. This video is part of the Orphan Works collection. When the rights-holder for a film cannot be found, that film is classified as an Orphan Work. Find out more about Orphan Works: http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/copyright/orphan_works/index_en.htm. This is in line with the EU Orphan Works Directive of 2012. The results of our search for the rights holder of this film can be found in the EU Orphan Works Database: https://euipo.europa.eu/ohimportal/en/web/observatory/orphan-works-database Subscribe: http://bit.ly/subscribetotheBFI. Watch more on the BFI Player: http://player.bfi.org.uk/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BFI Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BritishFilmInstitute Follow us on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+britishfilminstitute/

Early Technicolor discoveries from the BFI National Archive

Early Technicolor discoveries from the BFI National Archive

BFI curator Bryony Dixon talks us through a series of remarkable early Technicolor finds recently discovered at the BFI National Archive. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/subscribetotheBFI. Watch more on the BFI Player: http://player.bfi.org.uk/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BFI Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BritishFilmInstitute Follow us on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+britishfilminstitute/

Dame Diana Rigg on The Avengers | BFI

Dame Diana Rigg on The Avengers  | BFI

Subscribe: http://bit.ly/subscribetotheBFI. Five decades since she first appeared as Emma Peel in The Avengers (1961-1969), fans of the show still approach Dame Diana Rigg to express their gratitude. Rigg joins BFI curator Dick Fiddy to reflect on the influence of Peel on real-life women and acting with Patrick Macnee and Ian Hendry. Watch more on the BFI Player: http://player.bfi.org.uk/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BFI Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BritishFilmInstitute Follow us on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+britishfilminstitute/

In conversation with... Jodie Foster, on The Silence of the Lambs | BFI

In conversation with... Jodie Foster, on The Silence of the Lambs | BFI

Producer, director and actor Jodie Foster joins Edith Bowman to talk about her starring role as FBI agent Clarice Starling in Jonathan Demme's classic thriller, The Silence of the Lambs. Foster talks about lobbying for the part and Starling's importance as a feminist film icon. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/subscribetotheBFI. Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BritishFilmInstitute

Drag queen Bianca Del Rio: why I love Auntie Mame | BFI Flare

Drag queen Bianca Del Rio: why I love Auntie Mame | BFI Flare

Subscribe: http://bit.ly/subscribetotheBFI. RuPaul’s Drag Race winner Bianca Del Rio on Auntie Mame (1958), the classic comedy starring Rosalind Russell as an eccentric aunt bringing up her orphaned nephew. Del Rio explains the film’s huge LGBT following, and why she and many gay men wish they had an Auntie Mame in their lives. BFI Flare showcases the best new queer cinema, celebrating the diversity of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender culture from around the globe #BFIFlare bfi.org.uk/flare Watch more on the BFI Player: http://player.bfi.org.uk/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BFI Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BritishFilmInstitute Follow us on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+britishfilminstitute/

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